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20120901
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
old gymnast led the pledge of allegiance. >> i pledge allegiance, to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. ( cheers and applause ) >> thank you! >> ifill: that was followed by saxophonist branford marsalis performing the national anthem. ray suarez is on the floor now among the delegates, where he's been each night this week. >> suarez: you know, gwen, one of the biggest events of this week is something that isn'tingt going to happen, the long-expected and long-planned-for stadium welcome for president obama tomorrow night where he would give his acceptance speech. because of threatening skies, that has been canceled and moved indoors to the arena where the rest of the convention has been held. well, it means some inconvenience for the people who were set to appear there. it means some inconvenience for the people who were staging the event, but the real problem is with the tens of thousands of people who gave tens of thousands of volunteer hours in order to qualify fo
of the united states has officially declared himself an enemy of traditional marriage between one man and one woman. >> you are witness to a modern tale of resurrection. a second-coming. the bible speaks of lazarus, raised by jesus from the grave to walk again among the living. ralph reed, too, has been returned to life, political life. but he goes lazarus one further. lazarus was a poor man. reed is rich, and he just keeps getting richer from mixing religion and politics. and that's a story you don't want to miss. at age 33, ralph reed was the christian right's wonder boy. anointed in a 1995 "time" magazine cover story as the "right hand of god" for spinning the trust of conservative christians into political gold. it was reed who built the christian coalition of televangelist pat robertson into a powerful arm of the republican party. >> as religious conservatives we have finally gained what we have always sought. a place at the table, a sense of legitimacy and a voice in the conversation that we call democracy. >> in 2000, reed helped put george w. bush and dick cheney in the white house. >
was talking about when he was a united states senator. has there been a new idea in obama world in the past three or four years. i have trouble, frankly, thinking of that thing. but they have to unveil something to-- and you know the economist, the cover is-- of the coming issue is one little question, mr. obama what do you want to do. and that is the question. >> well, they're saying they had a conference call today with reporters and they are saying we will talk about the second term so i guess we'll find out. >> better have something pretty specific i think. >> we are specifically glad that the two of you made it safely back to washington. we know you are heading to charlotte with all of us for next week. david brooks, mark shields, thank you. >> woodruff: and a postscript-- we have a week's worth of highlights from the republican national convention online, including all of mitt romney's acceptance remarks and other speeches. >> brown: again, the major developments of the day: fresh off his convention, republican presidential nominee mitt romney flew to louisiana to survey the hurricane
. bellotti," where he said, "the state need not permit its own creature to consume it." and yet, this court is saying that, "we must permit the creation of the state legislures to consume our politics." and so to me, the citizens united case is the emblem for the whole era we're in. we're living in the "citizens united era," i think. >> but before citizens united, wealthy people were funneling money into politics, corporations were forming political action committees. and ceos of those corporations were lavishing money on selected favored political candidates. >> absolutely right, the corporate voice was never missing. and that's something, you know, justice stevens has pointed out. he said, "there were many faults to american politics. but nobody thought that a lack or a dearth of corporate voices was among the vices." but there was still a radical change effectuated by the majority -- >> how so? radical? >> in citizens united. >> what do you mean? >> because before corporations could have issue ads. they could take out an ad in the "new york times" on something. before the ceos and execut
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)